[GSoC] Templates in KDevelop – Week 5

My last report (here) was full of pictures, but since then I’ve spent more time polishing the functionality, behind-the-scene improvements, and fixing bugs. However, the mid-term evaluation is approaching, so I think let everybody know what’s the state of things. I’m happy with my progress, my schedule was a bit vague, but I think I’m ahead of it. So far I’m still enjoying it, and I bought a more comfortable chair, so I have little problems with working long hours.

I split out some functionality to make code more modular, which also allowed me to write unit tests for much of the newly added classes. The main parts of the code (TemplateRenderer, TemplateClassGenerator and TemplatesModel) are covered with test cases.

Class Templates

My main focus was still on templates for creating new classes. I slowly decided on the variables passed to templates. They are also documented, and I think I can start writing more templates about now. The C++ plugin adds some variables of its own, such as namespaces,

Since KDevelop’s Declarations must always point to a location in a source file, they cannot be created directly, I had to add my own classes for describing code before it is generated. This way, data members of a class can be declared. These code description classes are very simple, with only a couple of members, and are written so that Grantlee templates have access to all their properties.

The state of template class generation is such that it covers all functionality of the existing “Create Class” dialog. I have already written a basic C++ template that produces the same output. Of course, it is possible to create different classes, such as ones with private pointers, QObject’s macros, or in different languages.

Writing the Class Templates

As I said, I already wrote a template for a basic C++ class, as well as one with a d-pointer. Since I figured a lot of the code would be shared between templates for the same language, I added some basic templates that can be included. These are for method declarations, argument lists, namespaces, include guards, and some other small conveniences. There is also a library of custom template filters in kdevplatform. The end result is that the templates themselves can be relatively small. I even reduces the amount of whitespace in the rendered output, so that templates can be more readable while the generated classes are compact enough.

However, I don’t think it’s practical to store templates and filters for all possible languages in kdevplatform. So I intend to add a way for templates to specify dependencies on language plugin. Of course, they could still be written from scratch, or simply ship with the needed includes. It is merely a convenience.

The plan is to have language plugins provide some of their own templates and filters, but so far they are only for C++.

Templates, Templates Everywhere

Of course, KDevelop has other utilities for code generation, and I figured templates would be useful there as well. I started with inserting API documentation. The previous implementation manually constructed a Doxygen C++ style comment. I replaced that with a renderer template, which now supports C++, Php and Python.

Pressing Alt-Shitf-D on a declaration of a C++ functions results in this

API documentation with Doxygen for C++

While doing the same thing on a Python function produces this

API documentation with reST for Python

Not only is it formatted in reST, the most common format for Python documentation, but it also is positioned below the declaration, as a true Python docstring. Obviously, we still need to convert __kdevpythondocumentation_builtin type names to python types, but stripping a prefix can be done within a template thanks to Grantlee’s built-in filters.

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4 responses to this post.

  1. A small comment on the documentation template, any way it’d be possible to insert that by typing e.g. /**? Because that would be really quite neat… and, i would argue, decidedly easier to discover than yet another shortcut 😉 However, i’ve been looking forward to having that particular bit of functionality for ages, so very happy to see it finally happening! 🙂

    Reply

    • Posted by noughmad on 28. June 2012 at 14:43

      I think this is a good idea, and something I could use myself. I’ll see what I can do.

      Reply

    • Posted by noughmad on 29. June 2012 at 08:00

      No, I’m sorry. An unterminated comment breaks the language parsing, so KDevelop’s code completion is never invoked. Even invoking it manually doesn’t work because we have to parse the file to find the following declaration.

      Probably it could be done with a snippet or within Kate, but then you wouldn’t have access to the function you’re trying to document, so no automatic @param tags etc.

      So at least in the short term I must disappoint you.

      Reply

  2. Posted by Sven Brauch on 28. June 2012 at 15:14

    Great, docstring generation for python! Thanks for implementing that. 🙂

    Reply

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