Posts Tagged ‘C++’

Dune mid-term review

Hello!

Last week was the mid-term review for the GSoC. Because of this, I spend more time polishing and completing existing things than adding new ones. The biggest was documentation, I added docstrings to all the functions I’ve written since the start of coding. This should hopefully make it easier for everyone else to see what I did, but more importantly to extend it in the future.

This was, however, not all. Dune-perftest now has a couple (= two) example programs, written in C++ using the DUNE libraries. One is mostly empty and basically just measures the time needed for MpiHelper initialization, while the other works with matrices. Such programs will be used for monitoring the performance of DUNE itself. In order to build these C++ programs, I had to use the DUNE build system, based on autotools. I probably spent far more time than I should have on this one. As mostly a KDE developer, I am only used to CMake. I know that DUNE already supports CMake, and if I understand it correctly a complete move is planned, but at the moment I will include both.

There are no new screenshots, because graphically nothing has change since the last post. The actual generation of templates is somewhat improved, and the page (and graph) only shows data for the same command. I’m pretty happy with how both Bootstrap and Dygraphs turned out, I will probably redesign the page a little, but the graphs look good enough to me. However, I will add more information, starting with the memory footprint.

Now that the first half is over, I have to start planning ahead. My short-term goals are more automation and some statistics. More automation means you should be able to test multiple programs with one command. A couple more example C++ would help a lot for testing this. I will also make it possible to define both compile and run commands and have those associated with the same program. DUNE is mostly a template library, and these can often cause very long compile times. Once testing is automatic enough, there will be more data, so a need for meaningful statistics will arise. These can be basic enough, identifying outliers and general trends will be my first priorities.

 

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[GSoC] Class and Test Templates in KDevelop

 

I have generalized the “Create Class” dialog, so that it starts with a template selection page that is similar to what you see when starting a new project. It offers you a selection of templates of different types (currently only Class and Test) and programming languages. Selecting a templates leads to further assistant pages, which are chosen dynamically depending on the selected template’s type.

The first page of the “Create from Template” dialog

I have added wrapper classes for template rendering with Grantlee (KDevelop::TemplateRenderer) and template archives (KDevelop::SourceFileTemplate), so the assistant only deals with those to keep the code clean and readable. Both class and tests use the same format of template archives (described here), only with a some different variables.

As you can see from the screenshot, there’s already quite a few available templates to choose from. Considering a template only has to be written once, every project could have one or more preferred templates for new code. Existing ones can always be re-used, or maybe just tweaked slightly, so a little work can improve coding style and consistency.

 

 

[GSoC] Templates in KDevelop – Week 5

My last report (here) was full of pictures, but since then I’ve spent more time polishing the functionality, behind-the-scene improvements, and fixing bugs. However, the mid-term evaluation is approaching, so I think let everybody know what’s the state of things. I’m happy with my progress, my schedule was a bit vague, but I think I’m ahead of it. So far I’m still enjoying it, and I bought a more comfortable chair, so I have little problems with working long hours.

I split out some functionality to make code more modular, which also allowed me to write unit tests for much of the newly added classes. The main parts of the code (TemplateRenderer, TemplateClassGenerator and TemplatesModel) are covered with test cases.

Class Templates

My main focus was still on templates for creating new classes. I slowly decided on the variables passed to templates. They are also documented, and I think I can start writing more templates about now. The C++ plugin adds some variables of its own, such as namespaces,

Since KDevelop’s Declarations must always point to a location in a source file, they cannot be created directly, I had to add my own classes for describing code before it is generated. This way, data members of a class can be declared. These code description classes are very simple, with only a couple of members, and are written so that Grantlee templates have access to all their properties.

The state of template class generation is such that it covers all functionality of the existing “Create Class” dialog. I have already written a basic C++ template that produces the same output. Of course, it is possible to create different classes, such as ones with private pointers, QObject’s macros, or in different languages.

Writing the Class Templates

As I said, I already wrote a template for a basic C++ class, as well as one with a d-pointer. Since I figured a lot of the code would be shared between templates for the same language, I added some basic templates that can be included. These are for method declarations, argument lists, namespaces, include guards, and some other small conveniences. There is also a library of custom template filters in kdevplatform. The end result is that the templates themselves can be relatively small. I even reduces the amount of whitespace in the rendered output, so that templates can be more readable while the generated classes are compact enough.

However, I don’t think it’s practical to store templates and filters for all possible languages in kdevplatform. So I intend to add a way for templates to specify dependencies on language plugin. Of course, they could still be written from scratch, or simply ship with the needed includes. It is merely a convenience.

The plan is to have language plugins provide some of their own templates and filters, but so far they are only for C++.

Templates, Templates Everywhere

Of course, KDevelop has other utilities for code generation, and I figured templates would be useful there as well. I started with inserting API documentation. The previous implementation manually constructed a Doxygen C++ style comment. I replaced that with a renderer template, which now supports C++, Php and Python.

Pressing Alt-Shitf-D on a declaration of a C++ functions results in this

API documentation with Doxygen for C++

While doing the same thing on a Python function produces this

API documentation with reST for Python

Not only is it formatted in reST, the most common format for Python documentation, but it also is positioned below the declaration, as a true Python docstring. Obviously, we still need to convert __kdevpythondocumentation_builtin type names to python types, but stripping a prefix can be done within a template thanks to Grantlee’s built-in filters.